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Dealing with Conflict

This morning (Thursday), we had the opportunity to connect with our Fellowship pastors and leaders in the Hamilton/Niagara area for some encouragement and training. The topic today was on “Dealing with Conflict”. While you might not find that the most interesting of topics, I was reminded that a lot of what we do as Christians and leaders in the church is manage conflict – either before it happens or when it is happening. I am so thankful that we had the opportunity to learn about it and ourselves and how we can deal with it better and in a more Christ-like way.

Our speaker was Bob Flemming. Bob is our Regional Director for FEB Central (of which Calvary is part). Bob helps churches get established, grow and at times, steps in to assist a church that is stuck. A lot of the time the problem causing the “stuck-ness” results in conflict between two parties.

I was thankful this morning to be reminded that working towards oneness, harmony and indivisibility is not just a worthy cause, it’s biblical and it honours Christ.

In a church, conflict can come in many forms. From two people who struggle to work together in a ministry, to a family that struggles to get along, to a marriage that is feeling the pressure, and right up to a church that is in conflict because of changes that have taken place.

No matter what the cause of the conflict, we all have a responsibility for the way that we react. This is so true as we are seeking to follow Christ and grow in Him. Yes, we might be hurt. Yes, we might feel that we aren’t being listened to. Yes, we might feel that we are being taken advantage of. Yet we all have the choice for how we are going to react and respond.

Jesus said, “Blessed are the peacemaker for they will be called the children of God.” (Matt 5:9). If you remember from our sermon series in Proverbs, Jesus was calling upon the OT wisdom writers to instruct the new covenant people on how they ought to live out their faith. Peace-making and dealing with conflict is wise in God’s economy. One proverb I especially find helpful is Proverbs 17:1.

“Better a dry crust with peace and quiet than a house fully of feasting, with strife”

Do you get it? It’s better to work towards peace in all areas of our life, rather than living with conflict or strife.

Let me ask you a question as I close – “Is there an area in your life that you are harbouring conflict and strife?” My prayer is that we are called as gospel people to work towards peace. What are you doing in order to be a peacemaker. May we seek God’s wisdom to deal with conflict in a Christ honouring way.

By the way, I am so thankful for the peace and unity that we are enjoying at Calvary these days. God has been and continues to be, gracious to us. May we seek to live for Him and the Gospel for His glory in this area for a long time into the future!

In peace,

Pastor Aaron

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Shock Value

There's something about a good shock that invigorates us. It perks us up and brings us focus. I had an Old Testament teacher in Bible College who was very kind, and very knowledgeable. He wasn't one to raise his voice, unless pronouncing how he thought YHWH, the Hebrew name for God, should be pronounced. But once when class hadn't officially started and people were still milling around and talking, this teacher raised his voice and bellowed in a frustrated tone, “WHAT, ARE YOUR EARS PAINTED ON?”

The class went from calm conversation to utter silence.

We stopped what we were doing, frantically found our seats, and did our best to be quiet for fear of more yelling. But after a moment, the teacher burst into laughter and the class quickly followed suit as we realized he was joking. What followed was a really engaging class. There's just something about a good shock that perks you up.

This past weekend, our Junior Highs went to BEDLAM where they had the opportunity to rock-climb and skateboard, spend time with kids their age from all over Ontario, listen to an awesome worship band and be taught the Word – all in a setting that is geared to their own age.

Our speaker spent the weekend on the story of creation. How and why we were created, and what humanity did with that creation. On Saturday night he brought out a baseball bat and mirror. First he talked about how God had created us in His image, how we were created to be a reflection of him. But because of our sinful actions we had broken that creation – we had broken that reflection. And it was at this point that he swung the bat into the mirror and shattered it to pieces.

Every little conversation was silenced.

Those who hadn’t been listening, or who had fallen asleep, instantly perked up. Something big, loud, and messy had just happened on stage, and suddenly everyone's attention was focused on the stage. And then our speaker used the shocked silence to share the Gospel.

Whenever I see Gospel presentations with this kind of wow factor, I think about the scene after Jesus’ crucifixion, when He appears appears to the disciples alive and well.

The Gospel of Luke puts it like this,

Luke 24: 36-37

            ...Jesus himself was suddenly standing there among them. “Peace be with you,” he said. But the whole group was startled and frightened, thinking they were seeing a ghost!

I can just imagine the silence that overtook that room when Jesus appeared. The teacher they watched die, whom they buried on Friday, the one they were mourning, suddenly standing before them. For anyone doubting who Jesus was, this must have been an instant eye opener, an instant realization.

Can you imagine the response of those disciples? How energizing that must have been? How that must have shaped their lives, their ministry, and their resolve going forward? Is it any wonder that all of these Apostles maintained their belief in Jesus, even when 12 of the 13 (including Paul) were murdered for it? They had seen the risen Christ! The initial shock of Jesus’ return had silenced all their doubt, their wavering, their fear. Instead, they listened, they learned, and they got to work. And the Gospel needs to do the same to us.

What, are our ears painted on?

Mike Sanders, Director of Youth

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The Rescuing Gift of Jesus Christ

 

It’s unfair that all the fun stuff is made for kids. Light up shoes? For kids. Scented markers? Apparently for kids. And while I do my devotionals and navigate through page after page of monotonous black print on white pages, kids get these beautifully illustrated Children’s Bibles. Pictures of animals lining up 2-by-2 to board the ark, or of the stormy sea before Jesus calms the waves. But my favourite Bible illustration – by far – can be found on the very first page; the lush green landscape of the Garden of Eden.

In my mind, I imagine a Sunday School teacher reading through the story of Genesis to her class. The children in awe as she describes the plants and animals. Giggling as Adam and Eve are strategically placed behind leaves and shrubbery. And then, as the snake slinks out of the tree and starts up a conversation with Eve, I imagine the kids shouting, “Don’t listen to him! Don't do it! He’s the bad guy!”

Or maybe I imagine that because that’s what I’m internally shouting as I read that story.

Looking at those painted figures on a page, it’s easy to think, “Really?? Eve! Adam! What’s the deal?! There was literally only one rule!” Adam and Eve had access to what seemed to be heaven on earth if only they would be obedient in this small way. I would give anything to be in that garden; to walk with God.

And yet, in full honesty, every day I struggle with obedience. Each morning I wake up determined to do my best, and each evening I skulk around like Adam and Eve did after eating from the forbidden tree. But we are not made to dwell on our sin (as I'm so often inclined to do) and it was in reading through Romans 5 that's I've started to reconcile this.

Read the verses here from the Message:

“So death, this huge abyss separating us from God, dominated the landscape from Adam to Moses. Even those who didn’t sin precisely as Adam did by disobeying a specific command of God still had to experience this termination of life, this separation from God. But Adam, who got us into this, also points ahead to the One who will get us out of it.

Yet the rescuing gift is not exactly parallel to the death-dealing sin. If one man’s sin put crowds of people at the dead-end abyss of separation from God, just think what God’s gift poured through one man, Jesus Christ, will do! There’s no comparison between that death-dealing sin and this generous, life-giving gift. The verdict on that one sin was the death sentence; the verdict on the many sins that followed was this wonderful life sentence. If death got the upper hand through one man’s wrongdoing, can you imagine the breathtaking recovery life makes, sovereign life, in those who grasp with both hands this wildly extravagant life-gift, this grand setting-everything-right, that the one man Jesus Christ provides?”

As we look ahead to communion this Sunday, (and even further ahead as we anticipate Christmas), let us dwell on this incredible “rescuing gift” that God sent in his Son. The sin of Adam and Eve belongs to us still, but the guilt and shame do not! Think about that! Delight in that!

So often I fall into the same sin that Adam and Eve did. And when I see it, I have the same exasperation as when I read that Genesis story. But the beauty of the grace of Jesus is that it far surpasses the sin of Adam. It far surpasses my sin and yours. So please come to Calvary this Sunday prepared to receive the overwhelming grace that is given through Jesus Christ.

Jolene Sanders, Director of Worship

But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of works done by us in righteousness, but according to his own mercy, by the washing of regeneration and renewal of the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that being justified by his grace we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life. (Titus 3:4-7)

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Experiencing Loss

“Where’s the heartbeat?”

That small question began us on a journey that so many other couples have travelled, the journey from expectant parents to grieving people.

We were excited to become first-time parents in 1998 — we had waited quite a while after getting married in 1991 and we were ready to begin the next chapter in our lives.

Unfortunately the pregnancy was far from easy –– there were hormones to take, lots of complications, and then the diagnosis of a cystic hygroma (sac of water) at the base of our baby’s head, indicating potential birth or learning defects.

Despite the doctors’ advice we continued with the pregnancy because, whatever would happen, God would prepare us.

We were not prepared.

On June 26, 1998 I gave birth to our firstborn, a girl named Rachel Ann. She was born still, and we grieved. Oh, how we grieved.

Some told us to “just have another one” as if babies were as plentiful as Tic Tacs or sticks of gum. A few told us that the Lord knew we wouldn’t be able to handle her medical issues so He just spared us by taking her home. Most said they were sorry for our loss. Some didn’t say anything at all.

October marks the 30th anniversary of Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month, a time when families and friends remember little loved ones who were gone too soon.

If someone you love has experienced the loss of a child, there are a number of ways to comfort and support to the family. Here are just a few:

  1. Celebrate Life
    In the eyes of those who are grieving, it makes no difference if the child was miscarried after a few days or born still at full term. Where there was life, now there is none. The Psalmist reminds us that God knit us together, and we were known by Him from our earliest moments of life. So celebrate the life, no matter how briefly he or she lived.
     
  2. Honour the Child
    Try not to refer to him or her as “the miscarriage” or “the stillbirth” when you are speaking to the grieving parents, but instead say “your child.” Ask if the parents named their child, and if they did then use that name in conversation. You may be surprised to know that even parents who do not know the gender of their child still use names or nicknames for their baby, so ask what they named the child and lovingly weave the name into conversation.
     
  3. Give Some Space
    You may want to call, visit, hug, make meals and pray. But they might not be there just yet. Be available and ready to bear the burden of grief when the parents want to talk, but don’t push. Recognize that too much space might be seen as uncaring, and too little space can be suffocating. Watch for signs that the parents want to talk, or that they want to walk.
     
  4. Remember the Whole Family
    Many guys go into caregiver mode after a loss, wanting to ensure their spouse is recovering well. But Dads grieve too, so remember to check in with them. Give them a safe space to talk or not, depending on how they are feeling. And the same goes for grandparents —  they are experiencing all kinds of emotions as they process the loss of their grandchild. My mom told me after the fact that she was absolutely wrecked, but felt she couldn’t let her guard down for fear of upsetting me or others around me. Check in with all the family members and let them know you are praying for them.
     
  5. Time Doesn’t Heal All Wounds
    Grief takes as long as grief takes. The Bible tells us that there is a time to mourn, but it doesn’t qualify the statement with a timeframe. Don’t assume that just because “enough time has passed” (whatever that means), the family is ready for another pregnancy. It’s frightening, it’s daunting, and it’s kinda none of your business when they decide to try again — if ever. Time doesn’t heal wounds, but God in His mercy can bind up wounds, trade ashes of grief for the beauty of life. He heals.

If you have walked this journey of miscarriage and/or infant loss, my heart aches for you. But your story is not for you alone. Mark Batterson says, “If you don’t turn your adversity into a ministry, then your pain remains your pain. But if you allow God to translate your adversity into a ministry, then your pain becomes someone else’s gain."1 

Maybe your ministry is comforting others with the comfort that you yourself received (2 Cor 1:3–5). Or maybe your ministry comes from realizing how alone you felt and you don’t want another man or woman to experience that sadness. Regardless, I pray that your ministry to others is informed by your experience with a healing, loving and merciful Father.

Candi Thorpe
candi@calvaryburlington.ca

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Thanks for What?

On Thanksgiving Sunday we spent some time in Habakkuk, a small book in the Old Testament. Habakkuk was a prophet who was called by God to give a message to the people that judgement was coming because they had been so disobedient and spiritually dysfunctional. Frankly, Habakkuk is ticked with God that He won’t do anything about it, and that the people are getting away with their sinfulness. He writes, 

O Lord, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not hear?
Or cry to you “Violence!” and you will not save?
Why do you make me see iniquity, and why do you idly look at wrong?
Destruction and violence are before me; strife and contention arise.
So the law is paralyzed, and justice never goes forth.
For the wicked surround the righteous; so justice goes forth perverted. (Hab 1:1-4)

Israel was in spiritual ruins, and God tells Habakkuk that he is going to use the Babylonians to judge Israel’s sinfulness (1:6). Habakkuk does not see this as a good thing and complains again, basically asking God, "Aren’t you able to do this some other way?".

God uses this moment to instruct Habakkuk about who He is, what He is doing, and how He is going to go about doing it. He also takes the time to remind Habakkuk about our proper response to God during times when we don’t completely understand what God is doing or why He is doing it. God reminds Habakkuk that “the righteous will live by faith”. There is a quiet confidence that the child of God can know that when we don’t completely understand our challenges, that we can trust Him. 

Through a series of conversations between God and Habakkuk, Habakkuk finally comes to grips with what is happening. He understands that even though he and the people might suffer under the Babylonians, that God is still God and is sovereign and will be with them through it all.

Often the greatest tests of our fragile spirituality happens when we are faced with impeding suffering, pain and abuse. I am not talking about some fake, mask wearing, smile faking spirituality that tell everyone that “I’m ok”. What I am saying, and I think Habakkuk is instructing us, is that even when life is tough, God is there, doing something that requires faith and trust in Him.

The climax of the book comes when Habakkuk announces his reconfirmed faith and trust in God, and the song he sings is captured in chapter 3. For our time on Sunday we focused on three truths about cultivating a heart of thankfulness, even when we don’t feel like it or understand what God is doing. They flow out of the verses found in Habakkuk 3:17-19:

Though the fig tree should not blossom,
nor fruit be on the vines,
the produce of the olive fail
and the fields yield no food,
the flock be cut off from the fold
and there be no herd in the stalls,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord;
I will take joy in the God of my salvation.
God, the Lord, is my strength;
he makes my feet like the deer's;
he makes me tread on my high places.

Habakkuk realizes because of who God is, that he can...

  1. Thank God regardless of the challenges (17)
  2. Thank God for his salvation in the challenges (18)
  3. Thank God for God’s strength through the challenges (19)

So what was the take away for Thanksgiving Sunday?

Despite our challenges, what are we thanking God for? He has given us His Spirit to be present with us through our challenges, and that He ultimately gave us His Son, Jesus Christ. That through faith in His work on the cross we can find hope for this life and the one to come. Even while we wait and trust through the challenges we face, God’s strength is sufficient in our weakness.

I hope this is your experience with God. If you have any questions about this or about following Jesus in the challenges of life, I'd love to talk with you. Send me an email or set up a time to talk on a Monday night. 

Pastor Aaron Groat

 

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Rooted in God

I love to go on long walks and hikes. Everyday I walk my dog in the park by my home I always pass a tree. It’s just an old tree, and I’m not even sure of what type it is, but every time I go by, I am reminded of my children and when they were little. Each of them climbed this tree on our visits to the playground, and somehow they all carefully navigated their way to the main branch.

 

That tree seemed so much bigger back then. Now when I pass by, I recall those moments and how quickly life goes by.

Have you noticed that the tree is a very symbolic image in Scripture? Many varieties are mentioned including the olive, palm, oak, willow, pine, fig, and poplar –  just to name a few. There are many themes that come from this imagery as well. We often talk abut being rooted in our beliefs and values, and bearing fruit from our faith.

We have such a small window of time to build into our children, to guide them and to be examples. 

I love that our church has a Sunday school program where our children can gather, grow and learn. Our children’s ministry is rooted in God’s Word and we teach from Bible-centred curriculum. May we be reminded that the roots are what give a tree its strength, and nutrients!

Tanya Chant, Director of Family & Children's Ministry

“Let the field exult, and everything in it!  Then shall all the trees of the forest sing for joy.” Psalm 96:12

“He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream, and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit.”  Jeremiah 17:8

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Stories, Lessons and the Works of the Lord

When I was in High School I attended a church that believed that when you were too old to attend Sunday School, you were just the right age to begin teaching Sunday School. By the time I hit grade 10, I was teaching a boisterous class of grade 4 boys in a big gymnasium crisscrossed with room dividers.

Words can’t describe the noise level. Each week I came, woefully unprepared, to teach Bible stories to those boys and hoped I was making some sort of a difference. 

Recently I read Psalm 78 and reflected on those early days of teaching Bible stories in a gymnasium in Kitchener. You have to understand that Psalm 78 was written by Asaph; he had been appointed to pass on the stories of the marvellous deeds of God Almighty so that future generations would know and worship the Lord. But here’s the thing you'll notice when you read that Psalm: Asaph didn’t just tell the historical stories; he taught lessons about the goodness of God in the face of Israel’s repeated disobedience.

Stories and lessons?  C’mon, what’s the difference?

Well, the facts of what happened in Israel’s past is the story, but why and how God responded is the lesson. The physical and spiritual acts performed by God to rescue his people is a story, but the impact of how we worship and serve a faithful God is the lesson.

Psalm 78:6-8 tells us that God established a testimony and law which we are commanded to teach to our children so that they in turn tell their children, so they will set their hope in God and not forget His works. Check it out: 

He established a testimony in Jacob and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers to teach to their children, that the next generation might know them, the children yet unborn, and arise and tell them to their children, so that they should set their hope in God and not forget the works of God, but keep his commandments; and that they should not be like their fathers, a stubborn and rebellious generation, a generation whose heart was not steadfast, whose spirit was not faithful to God.

And I think this goes beyond the value of just teaching stories to our own children – this is transferrable to the relationships we have with those who are spiritually younger as well. By knowing the law and testimony of God (the stories and the lessons), future generations will not harden their heart toward the Lord. 

I confess that many times I have told the stories of God without teaching the lessons. Telling the story is easy, but teaching the lesson is hard because it means getting personal.  It means examining my heart to ensure that God is doing a work there before I teach others about God wanting to do a work in their heart. It means being humble and teachable and vulnerable. It means ensuring that my testimony begins with God’s testimony. It means knowing with certainty that God is the hero of my story (both the parts in the past and the parts yet unwritten) before I try to teach anyone else that God also wants to be the hero of their story. I taught Bible stories for years before I realized that if the people don’t see how the lesson impacts me, they’ll never see how it can impact them.

You might be a Sunday School teacher or helper, or maybe you are influencing future believers in your family, workplace or your community. As you communicate God’s Word, remember that it is the lessons that draw people to set their hope in Christ.

I’d love to hear from you about the lessons God is teaching you. Let’s grab a coffee (or three!) and encourage each other with the marvellous works of the Lord.

 

Candi Thorpe, Director of Administration, Communication and Frontline Ministries
candi@calvaryburlington.ca

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The Worshipping Church

 

As September comes with the renewed energy from some rest over the summer, we embark on a new ministry year that promises to move us as a church toward greater spiritual maturity – measured by a deepening love for God, love for His people and serving our community. I hope you are anticipating and praying for God to do something very special among us as a church this year.

September is also a time for me as your pastor to point us towards Jesus and His church in a very intentional way.  For 4-6 weeks, I address a topic of the local church and our call to mission. Themes have varied from year to year but I believe it’s important to focus in to what God would have our church be for the coming year. This September I want us to zoom in on what it means to be a worshipping church.

Worship is something that we often take for granted in the local church.  We make statements like “the worship was really good there” or “I didn’t like the worship” without really thinking through the implications of such a subjective comment.  Worship is much more than “really good” or “not likeable” if we have a firm understanding of what worship is. Worship is hard to define but put simply, “is the priority we place on who God is in our lives and where God is on our list of priorities.” (Delesslyn A. Kennebrew).

So, beginning this Sunday, I will be preaching for sermons in a series entitled, “The Worshipping Church”.  Each week we will unpack a various aspect of worship and its implications for the local church as we make it a priority.  It is my prayer that these messages will challenge us to reconfirm what we believe about worship and how what we do on a Sunday morning collectively is so important.

What I want to challenge you with this as we lead into Sunday is summed up in one word, “Preparation”. What is critical to these messages is how we prepare for them in advance.  Have you ever thought that the week leading up to Sunday is preparing us for what happens when we gather to worship as a church? I came across this quote from Jerry Bridges and it cuts to heart of what it means to be true worshippers of God who prepare.

 

“The vitality and genuineness of corporate worship is to a large degree dependent upon the vitality of our individual private worship.  If we aren’t spending time daily worshiping God, we’re not apt to contribute to the corporate experience of worship.  If we aren’t worshiping God during the week, how can we expect to genuinely participate in it on Sunday morning?  We may indeed go through the motions and think we have worshiped, but how can we honour and adore One on Sunday whom we have not taken time to praise and give thanks to during the week?
"I Exalt You, O God: Encountering His Greatness in Your Private Worship”, Jerry Bridges

 

Let me encourage you spend some time preparing for Sunday through Scripture reading, prayer, silence, service, whatever it takes to make sure that when we come together on Sunday we are ready to participate together and focus on our great God! I hope you will come with an expectant heart – ready to celebrate what God is doing and what He will continue to do.

See you the, by God’s grace,

You are dearly loved,
Pastor Aaron

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Who You Say I Am



This Sunday is “Name-tag Sunday” and I am so excited! And not just because I am terrible at remembering people's names (although I often am), but because most of my introductions go like this:

Me: Hi there! My name's Jolene.

Invariably a sweet older lady: Oh, Julie! What a pretty name!

Me: Oh, no, sorry, I'm JOLENE.

Older lady: Angeline! How nice!

Me: You know what? Just call me Jo. So nice to meet you!

Those interactions can be awkward and difficult, but there is value in being known, and being known rightly.

I could have let that little old lady call me Angeline, but that's not who I am.

It's interesting, though, that I would put so much time and effort into making sure people pronounce my name correctly, but when it comes to who I really am, I allow myself to get it wrong all the time.

All too often, I let Satan convince me that my identity is based on personal effort and accomplishments, and because of that, I am never satisfied with who I am.

I am constantly striving.

Constantly trying to make more of myself.

Constantly trying to prove my worth.

Constantly trying to hide my flaws.

There's a song I've really grown to appreciate called “Who You Say I Am”, and what I love about it is that it brings me back to the truth - that my identity is not based on what I do for Christ, but on what Christ has done for us.

Because when we strive to make more of ourselves, we are inherently making less of Jesus.

Of His power.

Of His might.

And I thank God that His power is made perfect in weakness, because often that seems to be all I have to give Him, but I am even more thankful that I am not defined by my weakness. That through His power and through His promise, who I am is wholly and completely because of who Christ is in me.

Jolene (Jo!) Sanders, Director of Worship,
jolene@calvaryburlington.ca

I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

                                                                                                - Galatians 2:20

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Feeling Parched?

I have always loved desert imagery in the Old Testament; there’s something pretty amazing about God bringing beautiful new life to ground that had once been dry and barren.

In 2010 I had been going through a dry season in my spiritual life. I still loved Jesus and I knew He loved me, but I felt somewhat stuck in the ways I was growing. I was desperate for some relief from the dryness of my prayer life. I would go for walks in the evenings, asking God, “What needs to change? What are my next steps?”

One morning I opened an email from FEB Central and the first line jumped off the page. It said, “Have you ever wondered about your next steps?”

Yes!

The email described Women’s Ministries Institute, a 9-month course offered by FEB Central to equip women to grow deeper in their spiritual journey for effective leadership. I prayed about it and decided to join the class, graduating in June 2011. A few years later, Sarah Bean also joined, graduating as the Valedictorian of her class (Yay Sarah - great job!).

If you are a woman and are feeling like you are going through a place of spiritual drought, you are not alone. I know that there are days where you just go through the motions, and there are other days that you don't even bother trying to do that.

Sisters (and brothers!), we are promised in Isaiah 41 that when we are feeling dry and parched, God will not forsake us. He will pour out rivers, filling our valleys with life-giving water. He brings new growth to those places in our spiritual lives that have felt barren and dead.

If you'd like more information about WMI, you can talk to Sarah Bean or myself, and visit their website here: www.womensministriesinstitute.com. Maybe WMI isn't for you at this time, but please don't stop asking God, "What are my next steps?" Because God will always remind you that your next steps are the ones that draw you closer to Him.

Candi Thorpe,
candi@calvaryburlington.ca

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Press On

It took me a while to decide what to write about this week. I wanted to write something beautiful and inspiring, but instead I’m going to write about discipline.

I even gave a few tries at writing a lovely little Mother’s Day blog, but no… we’re going to talk about discipline.

Before we go any further, take a moment to read through Hebrews 12.

To many of you it’s a familiar passage. It encourages us to run the race set before us. When I was younger, I always thought that was a great analogy, because it seemed so exciting! I pictured the 100-meter dash at the Olympics; adrenaline pumping, crowds cheering, putting everything on the line.

But the reality is that our race is more like a really, really, really long marathon.

You’re probably going to feel like walking for part of it. Or you might get a cramp partway through and wonder if you’ll make it to the finish line at all.

You will get tired.

But the author of Hebrews writes, “It is for discipline that you have to endure…. For the moment, all discipline feels painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.” (Emphasis added)

As a parent, I know how difficult it can be to discipline a child. But I also know that not to discipline my son would be a disservice. Because I don’t just care about who he is now, I care about his whole life. It can be painful and frustrating, but we discipline our children because we love them.

And how much more does our Father in Heaven love us. So much so that he takes the time – despite our resistance, despite our stubbornness – to shape and mold us into who we are meant to be.

So press on - even when you feel exhausted, even when you’re overwhelmed – press on to the finish line.

Jolene Sanders, Director of Worship
jolene@calvaryburlington.ca

I do not claim that I have already succeeded or have already become perfect. I keep striving to win the prize for which Christ Jesus has already won me to himself.  Of course, my friends, I really do not think that I have already won it; the one thing I do, however, is to forget what is behind me and do my best to reach what is ahead.  So I run straight toward the goal in order to win the prize, which is God's call through Christ Jesus to the life above.” (Philippians 3:12-14)

“For He disciplines for our good, that we may share his holiness” (Hebrews 12:10)

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God is Still on His Throne and He Still Cares

There is no doubt that the tragic events of the past couple weeks have rattled us all a bit. From the tragic loss of life in a bus crash to the senseless violence of a man in Toronto, all of us have been forced to hold our loved ones closer and recognise the brevity of life.

There are no easy answers when it comes to the why. Why did this happen? How could God have allowed this to take place? These are good questions. These are hard questions, and in the middle of the crisis there are no easy answers. I find later that after some time has passed, allowing a period of reflection, we can come to terms with some of these things, but it’s never an easy process.

What encourages me about both of these events is that people came together to reach out beyond themselves to find hope and encouragements. Many turned to their faith and it was in the confidence and hope of the gospel, they were able to start the process of healing and restoration.

Sean Brandow, the chaplain to the Homboldt Broncos, spoke to the community vigil of this hope when he said,

“Where was God? That question has two answers. God is on the throne and God is with the broken-hearted. We know that God is on the throne, Jesus walked this earth, he died, he was buried, he rose again. It says in the scripture that he is now seated at the right hand of the Father, in control of setting up our leaders, putting people in the place where they need to be at just the right time, for just the right purpose, making sure that things line up according to his plan. I don’t claim to understand how this seems like it’s in God’s control at all, but it is. He’s still on the throne, he’s still God. You know, I asked the question as you look at God on the throne, it’s easy to look at God from a distance but the second part of that question of where is God is that he’s with us.” 1

I’ll allow you to read the rest of the message yourself, but those two answers cut across the airways of Canada and beyond. In other words, our God is still sovereign and He is still with those who suffer. Powerful words to our nation who is struggling to find meaning in these situations. I don’t claim to understand how God’s sovereignty works, but I do know that He is working out His plan in this world that is so much bigger than me or my comfort. I don’t claim to understand how his comfort works but I do cling to the truth that He is with me no matter what. He loves us and in spite of the evil around us, He is with us through the pain and anguish – gently encouraging and speaking words of hope and love.

So this week, in spite of what is happening in the Homboldt or Toronto, be reminded of the hope that we have in Christ. Peter reminds the church of this hope today and a time coming soon.

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you, who by God’s power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, so that the tested genuineness of your faith—more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire—may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.” 1 Peter 1:3-6

Pastor Aaron Groat
aaron@calvaryburlington.ca

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